Arts: The Three Major Types of Arts Explored

There are three major types of arts. We will be examining each of these types of art in turn. For each type of art, we will be seeking to understand several things. Firstly, we will be seeking to understand what each is all about (and, by extension what the products of each type of art are). Secondly, we will be seeking to understand which types of people typically pursue each type of art. Thirdly, we will be seeking to understand why the people who pursue each type of art do so.

Without further ado, the three major types of arts are:

‘Fine’ arts

Here, we are looking at arts such as drawing and painting. Extended, this category would also incorporate arts such as pottery, sculpting and so on. These products of these arts are items that are visually appreciable (and, indeed, items whose value is largely visual). Those are things like drawings, paintings, pottery products and sculptures.

As is the case with all other types of arts, fine arts typically attract folks who have a feeling that they have ‘talent.’ This talent may be inborn or developed. Actually all talent is developed, the ‘inborn-ness’ only yields the inclination for development of the talent. Unlike certain other artists, the people who practice fine art often turn out to be sociable, fun-liking folks. But they often get too engrossed in their artistic pursuits, to the detriment of other areas of their lives.

Many of the people who practice fine arts seem to get a certain level of satisfaction from the artistic pursuits alone. This makes it possible for them to pursue the arts just for the sake of it. Increasingly though, visual arts are turning out to be well paying pursuits. On that account, another crop of fine artists has come up: these being artists who pursue the arts solely for financial gain. Conventional wisdom held that such financially motivated artists would turn out to be mediocre artists. But increasingly, we are seeing monetarily motivated artists actually turning out impressive works, hence challenging that piece of conventional wisdom.

Literary arts

Here, we are looking at arts like writing and poetry.

The products of this group of arts are things like novels, short stories and poems.

The practitioners of these arts often turn out to be introverted, sensitive and reclusive folks. Even when they are within groups of people, they often turn out to be observers, rather than full partakers of the fun. This is what forms the material for the deep observations on the human condition they make in their literary works (that is, the observations they make in the few human interactions they have).

The practitioners of these arts are mostly motivated to pursue them by the desire for expression of the ideas and feelings they accumulate ‘in their chests,’ thanks to their hypersensitive nature. A few are motivated by the desire to make money (and these often lose interest fast, when the money seems to be taking too long in coming).

Performing arts

Here, we are looking at things like theater acting, movie acting, the musical arts, acrobatics and so on.

The products of these arts are therefore things like theater plays, TV plays (and drama programs), movies and the various types of music.

The practitioners of these arts often turn out to be very outgoing people. They are the most outgoing of all groups of artists. They are typically fun loving party animals.

Some folks are motivated to pursue these performing arts by the desire to become famous. Others are motivated to pursue the arts by the desire to express themselves (especially those who get into the musical niches). Yet others are motivated by the desire to become rich.

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